IEEE Nanotechnology Materials and Devices Conference (NMDC)
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Archive for the ‘speaker’ Category

Tatiana Segura

Sunday, October 25th, 2020

Annealed Hydrogel Microparticles as Scaffolds for Tissue Repair

Tatiana Segura, Duke University

Abstract:

Injectable materials that can conform to the shape of a desired space are used in a variety of fields including medicine. The ability to fill a tissue defect with an injectable material can be used for example to deliver drugs, augment tissue volume, or promote repair of an injury. This talk will explore the development of injectable materials that are based on assembled particle building blocks, for tissue repair. We find that using microparticle building blocks to build the scaffold generates a porous network by the space left behind between adjacent building blocks. Due to the injectability of this microporous material we have explored its wide applicability to tissue repair applications ranging from skin to brain wounds. We find that in the skin our particle scaffold promotes wound closure and granulation tissue thickness more than widely used polymeric crosslinked hydrogels. In both the brain and the skin our particle scaffolds result in reduced inflammation.

Bio:

Tatiana Segura, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Neurology and Dermatology at Duke University. She received her BS degree in Bioengineering from the University of California Berkeley and her doctorate in Chemical Engineering from Northwestern University working with Lonnie Shea. She joined Jeffrey A. Hubbell’s laboratory for her postdoctoral work. In 2006 she joined the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department at University of California Los Angeles as a tenure track Assistant Professor, a position she secured in 2004 before begining her postdoctoral appointment. In 2012 she received tenure and was promoted to Associate Professor. In 2016 she was promoted to the title of Professor.  She joined the Duke faculty in 2018. Segura has received numerous awards and distinctions during her career, including the 2020 Acta Biomaterialia Silver Medal, a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation, an Outstanding Young Investigator Award from the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy and a National Scientist Development Grant from the American Heart Association. She was also named a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineers in 2017. Prof. Segura has published over 150 peer reviewed papers and reviews and has over 6,000 citations. Her laboratory has been continuously funded with several grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) since 2008. She currently serves as a permanent member of the Gene and Drug Delivery Study section at NIH.

 

 

Dong Sun

Sunday, October 25th, 2020

Microrobotic Systems for Cell Manipulation

Dong Sun, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Center for Robotics and Automation, City University of Hong Kong

Abstract:

The application of robot technology to achieve early diagnosis and treatment of diseases at the cellular level represents a new frontier in the development of contemporary medical robots. Microrobotic system for cell therapy is an entirely new emerging theme that is enabled with specially designed automated micromanipulation tools to perform medical diagnosis and treatment on single cells at large scale. This talk will introduce our development of combining robotics technologies with micro-manipulation tools including optical tweezers, micro-needles and electromagnetic devices, to accomplish various cell manipulation tasks. With this emerging technology, numerous cell surgical operations can be achieved, which include cell transportation and rotation, cell biopsy and microinjection, and precise delivery of cells with magnetic actuation. These inventions will permit many new unforeseen clinical applications previously thought impossible, and profoundly affect therapeutic treatment in precision medicine.

Biography:

Dong Sun is currently the head and Chair Professor of the Department of Biomedical Engineering and Director of the Center for Robotics and Automation, City University of Hong Kong. He is among the leading contributors worldwide in pioneering work in robotic manipulation of biological cells. His research has breakthrough in the use of combined robotics and various micro-engineering tools including optical tweezers, micro-needles and electromagnetic devices to achieve cell manipulation, diagnosis and micro-surgery at the single cell level. He has published 20 books and book chapters, 430 papers in referred journals and conference proceedings, and holds 18 international patents. He has directed more than 40 PhD students to graduate in Hong Kong. Dr. Sun organizes several international flagship conferences including the world largest intelligent robot conference (IROS 2019). Dr. Sun also actively participated in industrial activities, such as co-founding a high-tech company in the Hong Kong Science and Technology Park and winning Hong Kong Industry Awards. He is Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering and Fellow of IEEE.

 

Paul S. Weiss

Sunday, October 25th, 2020

Atomically Precise Chemical, Physical, Electronic, and Spin Contacts and Interfaces

Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Bioengineering, and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA

Abstract:

Two seemingly conflicting trends in nanoscience and nanotechnology are our increasing ability to reach the limits of atomically precise structures and our growing understanding of the importance of heterogeneity in the structure and function of molecules and nanoscale assemblies. By having developed the “eyes” to see, to record spectra, and to measure function at the nanoscale, we have been able to fabricate structures with precision as well as to understand the important and intrinsic heterogeneity of function found in these assemblies. The physical, electronic, mechanical, and chemical connections that materials make to one another and to the outside world are critical. Just as the properties and applications of conventional semiconductor devices depend on these contacts, so do nanomaterials, many nanoscale measurements, and devices of the future. We discuss the important roles that these contacts can play in preserving key transport and other properties. Initial nanoscale connections and measurements guide the path to future opportunities and challenges ahead. Band alignment and minimally disruptive connections are both targets and can be characterized in both experiment and theory. Chiral assemblies can control the spin properties and thus transport at interfaces. I discuss our initial forays into these areas in a number of materials systems.

Biography:

Paul S. Weiss graduated from MIT with S.B. and S.M. degrees in chemistry in 1980 and from the University of California at Berkeley with a Ph.D. in chemistry in 1986. He is a nanoscientist and holds a UC Presidential Chair and a distinguished professor of chemistry & biochemistry, bioengineering, and materials science & engineering at UCLA, where he was previously director of the California NanoSystems Institute. He also currently holds visiting appointments at Harvard’s Wyss Institute and several universities in Australia, China, and South Korea. He studies the ultimate limits of miniaturization, developing and applying new tools and methods for atomic-resolution and spectroscopic imaging and patterning of chemical functionality. He and his group apply these advances in other areas including neuroscience, microbiome studies, tissue engineering, and high-throughput gene editing. He led, coauthored, and published the technology roadmaps for the BRAIN Initiative and the U.S. Microbiome Initiative. He has won a number of awards in science, engineering, teaching, publishing, and communications. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Chemical Society, American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, American Physical Society, American Vacuum Society, Canadian Academy of Engineering, IEEE, Materials Research Society, and an honorary fellow of the Chinese Chemical Society and Chemical Research Society of India. He is the founding and current editor-in-chief of ACS Nano.