IEEE Nanotechnology Materials and Devices Conference (NMDC)
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Archive for the ‘speaker21’ Category

Naomi Halas

Friday, October 30th, 2020

Nanomaterials and Light for Sustainability and Societal Impact

Naomi Halas, Stanley C. Moore Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University

Abstract:

Metallic nanoparticles, used since antiquity to impart intense, vibrant color into materials, then brought to scientific attention in the 19th century as “Faraday’s colloid”, have more recently become a central tool in the nanoscale manipulation of light. When excited by light, metallic nanoparticles undergo a coherent oscillation of their conduction electrons- known as a plasmon- which is responsible for their strong light-matter interactions and properties. While the scientific foundation of this field has been built on noble and coinage metals (most typically gold or silver), more recently we have begun to question whether the same, or similar properties can also be realized in more sustainable materials. Aluminum, the most abundant metal on our planet, can support high-quality plasmonic properties spanning the UV-to-IR region of the spectrum. Coupling a plasmonic nanoantenna directly to catalytic nanoparticles transforms the entire complex into an efficient light-controlled catalyst capable of driving chemical reactions under surprisingly mild, low temperature conditions. This new type of light-based catalyst can be utilized for remediating greenhouse gases, and converting them to useful molecules for industry, or benign molecules for a cleaner planet. We have previously introduced photothermal effects for biomedical therapeutics; now, years after their initial demonstration, this approach is being utilized in human trials for the precise and highly localized ablation of cancerous regions of the prostate, eliminating the highly deleterious side effects characteristic of conventional prostate cancer therapies. Photothermal effects can also be harvested for sustainability applications, which we have most recently demonstrated in an off-grid solar thermal desalination system that transforms membrane distillation into a scalable water purification process.

Biography:

Dr. Naomi J. Halas holds faculty appointments in the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Physics and Astronomy, Chemistry, Materials Science and Nanoengineering, and Bioengineering. She is best known as the first person to demonstrate that controlling the geometry of metallic nanoparticles determines their color. She pursues studies of plasmonic and nanophotonic systems and their applications. She is author of more than 300 refereed publications, has more than 20 issued patents, and has presented more than 500 invited talks. She has been awarded the APS Frank Isakson Prize and Julius Lilienfeld Prize, the R. W. Wood Prize of the OSA, the ACS Award in Colloid Chemistry, and the Spiers Medal of the Royal Society of Chemistry. Halas has been elected to the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering (U.S.), and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

 

Mark Johnson

Sunday, October 25th, 2020

Practical Quantum Computing

Mark Johnson, D-Wave

Abstract:

Quantum computing has entered an era where differentiation is better measured in the variety and value of customer applications than it is with physical device metrics. I will review D-Wave’s recent product release, advantage, its role in D-Wave’s approach to attacking business scale problems, and some of the practical uses it is being put to.  These include scheduling, logistics, portfolio optimization, risk assessment, and de novo protein design. Quantum annealing has also shown significant promise in quantum materials simulation, and I will review some of the most important results in this area. While there are no Universal Quantum Computers today, I will discuss the prospects for, and directions towards Universal Quantum Computing.

Bio:

Mark Johnson Ph.D., Vice President of Quantum Products. Mark joined D-Wave in 2005 as an experimental physicist and superconducting circuit design engineer. He continues to work with the D-Wave’s Quantum Processor Development Team as it has developed and delivered five generations of commercial Quantum Annealing Systems. Prior to joining D-Wave, Mark worked as a Scientist with the Superconductive Electronics Organization in TRW, Inc.

 

Jessica E. Koehne

Sunday, October 25th, 2020

Carbon Nanomaterial Based Sensors and Devices for NASA Missions

Jessica E. Koehne, NASA Ames Research Center

Abstract:

Carbon nanomaterials have been investigated for their use in NASA missions due to their interesting electronic, mechanical, optical, and thermal properties. At NASA Ames Research Center, we have evaluated carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanofibers (CNFs), and graphene for electrochemical sensor and electronics applications, including crew health and environmental monitoring. In our earliest work, carbon nanomaterials were controllably grown by chemical vapor deposition to create high-ordered structures capable of high sensitivity and low background measurements. Sensor devices with these structures were manufactured as sensor arrays in combination with traditional photolithography for wafer-scale manufacturing. These sensor arrays have been demonstrated as multiplexed sensors for rapid crew health screening. More recently, carbon nanomaterials have been tailored and processed as printable inks for highly tunable, additive manufacturing of electrochemical sensors and electronics. These printed sensor devices enable on-demand manufacturing in the microgravity environment of space. In this work, we have explored multiple materials, device architectures, and printing methodologies, all suitable for in-space manufacturing of crew health monitoring sensor devices. This presentation will explore the benefits of both manufacturing approaches, on silicon and printed, and highlight their use towards NASA missions.

Bio:

Dr. Jessica E. Koehne is a Physical Scientist at the NASA Ames Center for Nanotechnology. She received a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of California, Davis in 2009, while in collaboration with NASA Ames Research Center. She has spent the past 20 years developing a carbon nanofiber, carbon nanotube, and graphene-based sensor platforms for detection of DNA, rRNA, proteins and neurotransmitters, with applications ranging from point-of-care for astronaut health monitoring including implantable and wearable sensors to the detection of life signatures for planetary exploration. With significant experience in device fabrication including nanomaterial growth and integration, surface chemistry, electrochemical characterization, and sensor validation, she currently leads the highly interdisciplinary Nano-Biosensor Team. She has authored 64 articles in peer-reviewed journals and made 38 scientific presentations, including 21 invited talks. Dr. Koehne received numerous honors and awards including the 2011 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) and the 2018 Women in Aerospace Achievement Award. She serves as the chair of the Electrochemical Society’s Sensor Division, has served on several Ph.D. thesis committees, and is an Adjunct Graduate Faculty member at Boise State University.

 

Tatiana Segura

Sunday, October 25th, 2020

Annealed Hydrogel Microparticles as Scaffolds for Tissue Repair

Tatiana Segura, Duke University

Abstract:

Injectable materials that can conform to the shape of a desired space are used in a variety of fields including medicine. The ability to fill a tissue defect with an injectable material can be used for example to deliver drugs, augment tissue volume, or promote repair of an injury. This talk will explore the development of injectable materials that are based on assembled particle building blocks, for tissue repair. We find that using microparticle building blocks to build the scaffold generates a porous network by the space left behind between adjacent building blocks. Due to the injectability of this microporous material we have explored its wide applicability to tissue repair applications ranging from skin to brain wounds. We find that in the skin our particle scaffold promotes wound closure and granulation tissue thickness more than widely used polymeric crosslinked hydrogels. In both the brain and the skin our particle scaffolds result in reduced inflammation.

Bio:

Tatiana Segura, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Neurology and Dermatology at Duke University. She received her BS degree in Bioengineering from the University of California Berkeley and her doctorate in Chemical Engineering from Northwestern University working with Lonnie Shea. She joined Jeffrey A. Hubbell’s laboratory for her postdoctoral work. In 2006 she joined the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department at University of California Los Angeles as a tenure track Assistant Professor, a position she secured in 2004 before begining her postdoctoral appointment. In 2012 she received tenure and was promoted to Associate Professor. In 2016 she was promoted to the title of Professor.  She joined the Duke faculty in 2018. Segura has received numerous awards and distinctions during her career, including the 2020 Acta Biomaterialia Silver Medal, a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation, an Outstanding Young Investigator Award from the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy and a National Scientist Development Grant from the American Heart Association. She was also named a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineers in 2017. Prof. Segura has published over 150 peer reviewed papers and reviews and has over 6,000 citations. Her laboratory has been continuously funded with several grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) since 2008. She currently serves as a permanent member of the Gene and Drug Delivery Study section at NIH.

 

 

Dong Sun

Sunday, October 25th, 2020

Microrobotic Systems for Cell Manipulation

Dong Sun, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Center for Robotics and Automation, City University of Hong Kong

Abstract:

The application of robot technology to achieve early diagnosis and treatment of diseases at the cellular level represents a new frontier in the development of contemporary medical robots. Microrobotic system for cell therapy is an entirely new emerging theme that is enabled with specially designed automated micromanipulation tools to perform medical diagnosis and treatment on single cells at large scale. This talk will introduce our development of combining robotics technologies with micro-manipulation tools including optical tweezers, micro-needles and electromagnetic devices, to accomplish various cell manipulation tasks. With this emerging technology, numerous cell surgical operations can be achieved, which include cell transportation and rotation, cell biopsy and microinjection, and precise delivery of cells with magnetic actuation. These inventions will permit many new unforeseen clinical applications previously thought impossible, and profoundly affect therapeutic treatment in precision medicine.

Biography:

Dong Sun is currently the head and Chair Professor of the Department of Biomedical Engineering and Director of the Center for Robotics and Automation, City University of Hong Kong. He is among the leading contributors worldwide in pioneering work in robotic manipulation of biological cells. His research has breakthrough in the use of combined robotics and various micro-engineering tools including optical tweezers, micro-needles and electromagnetic devices to achieve cell manipulation, diagnosis and micro-surgery at the single cell level. He has published 20 books and book chapters, 430 papers in referred journals and conference proceedings, and holds 18 international patents. He has directed more than 40 PhD students to graduate in Hong Kong. Dr. Sun organizes several international flagship conferences including the world largest intelligent robot conference (IROS 2019). Dr. Sun also actively participated in industrial activities, such as co-founding a high-tech company in the Hong Kong Science and Technology Park and winning Hong Kong Industry Awards. He is Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering and Fellow of IEEE.